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Calculating Square Footage of a Room for Your Flooring Project

 

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Calculating square footage of a room is the very first step on buying new flooring. This guide will help you to figuring out how much square footage you need. Taking each measurement is very critical as any mis-calculation can end up with purchasing additional product and paying double shipping cost if purchasing flooring online. The flooring industry guideline is to order an additional 10% for any cuts or mistakes that are made during installation.

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The first step to finding total square footage is determining all rooms that will have new flooring.

Label each room as A, B, C and so forth.

You first want to gather the following items:
• Tape measure
• Calculator
• Notepad and pencil/pen for measurements

Calculating the square footage of a regular rectangular room (Room A):

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Steps 1: Measure the length and width inside the room with your tape measure.
Step 2: Record your dimensions on a piece of paper.
Step 3: We went ahead and used 12ft for our width and 5ft for our length.
Step 4: You will take the dimensions and multiple them together (12 x 5) to get your square footage.
Step 5: You should get 60 for Room A.

Room A has 60 square footage.

This example was very basic and wouldn’t be an ideal 12 foot x 5 foot room. So what do you do if you have 12 feet 3 inches for the width and 10 feet 7 inches for the length?

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Steps 1: Measure the length and width inside the room with your tape measure.
Step 2: Record your dimensions on a piece of paper.

Step 3: You would round up to the nearest number. For example: the width of 12 feet 3 inches would actually be 13 feet. The length of 10 feet 7 inches will be 11 feet.
Step 4: You will take these dimensions and multiple them together (13 x 11) to get your square footage.
Step 5: You should get the number 143 for Room B.

Room B has 143 square footage.

So how do you calculate the square footage of a room that has closets:

Calculating the square footage of a room that has a closet shouldn’t be tricking. The easiest method to do this is separate or split the room into separate rectangles.

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Steps 1: We first separated the main space and the closet into two different dimensions/spaces. Dimension 1 (blue) is the main larger space. Dimension 2 (orange) is the closet.
Step 2: Your first task is to measure the main length and width inside the room with your tape measure. (Dimension 1)
Step 3: Record your dimensions on a piece of paper.
Step 4: We went ahead and used 5 feet 3 inches (remember to round up to 6 feet) for our width and 10 feet 7 inches (remember to round up to 11 feet) for our length.
Step 4: You will take the dimensions and multiple them together (6 x 11) to get your square footage for Dimension 1 for Room C.
Step 5: You should get the number 66 for Dimension 1.
Step 6: Repeat Steps 2-5 for Dimension 2. You should get the number 15 for Dimension 2.
Step 7. After calculating all separate rectangles, you would add them up to get your overall square footage. Dimension 1 (66) + Dimension 2 (15) equals 81 sq ft.

Room C has 81 square footage.

You can apply this method to some complicated rooms such as:

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Consider adding waste factor for your flooring project

It is always a good idea to add 10% to your square footage. Here is a couple of reasons why:
• You will have to cut the length of flooring to fit in certain spaces
• Everyone miscalculates dimensions and will make the wrong cut
• You might not like the one particular flooring plank design and will set it aside
• Ordering an extra box of flooring at the end can cost you in shipping charges
• If you run out of flooring during installation, your project can be put on hold
• If you order flooring for exact square footage and don’t get to project right away, the flooring might be discontinued when you do install. Finding the extra square footage of the discontinued flooring can be a nightmare.

So how do you calculate for the waste factor? Easy.

Here is our room examples from above:

  • Room A: 60 (sq ft) x 0.10 (waste factor) = 6
    • 60 (sq ft) + 6 (waste factor) = 66 sq ft needed for room A
  • Room B: 143 x by 0.10 = 14.3
    • 143 (sq ft) + 14.3 (waste factor) = 157.3 sq ft needed for room B
  • Room C: 81 x by 0.10 = 8.1
    • 81 (sq ft) + 8.1 (waste factor) = 89.1 sq ft needed for room C
  • Room D: 84 x by 0.10 = 8.4
    • 84 (sq ft) + 8.4 (waste factor) = 92.4 sq ft needed for room D